Tag Archives: conservation

The Current Conservation Status of The Gray Whale

With migrations of gray whales peaking in mid-January along the Bay Area coastline, now is a good time to have a bit more in depth of a look at the gray whale. This organism’s conservation classification is not straight forward, even though their geographical range is relatively small, as there are different stocks positioned in different geographical locations with different population numbers. 

Continue reading

Dr. James Sumich: Gray Whales

Dr. James Sumich: “Gray Whales” 
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
7:00 -9:00 P.M.
Bay Model Visitor Center, Sausalito, CA


Jim will discuss the past and current distributions, migrations, and genetics of gray whales, and some likely future scenarios for this species in the in the context of our changing climate. Jim’s book “E. robustus: The Biology and Human History of Gray Whales” will be available for purchase and signing at the talk. Continue reading

Claire Simeone: Understanding the Role of Sinus Parasites in Cetaceans Stranded Along the California Coast

Claire Simeone SF Bay Area ACS Grantee:
“Understanding the Role of Sinus Parasites in Cetaceans Stranded Along the California Coast”
Tuesday, August 22, 2017
7:00 – 9:00 P.M.
Bay Model Visitor Center, Sausalito, CA

ivancic-et-al-2014Cetaceans strand for a variety of reasons, including infectious disease, trauma, intoxication and parasitism. Small cetaceans commonly have parasites that inhabit the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Worms can inhabit the sinuses, as well as the ear canal and middle ear. These parasites have occasionally been found damaging the nerves and brain of animals, causing disruption of equilibrium or acoustic abilities. However, it is unknown whether these parasites are commonly encountered without causing neurologic issues. Computed tomography (CT) scans assist researchers by providing important baseline data on the effects of these parasites on the animal’s health. The Marine Mammal Center and California Academy of Sciences are working together to better understand the role parasites play in strandings, in order to help us better manage live cetacean strandings in the future. Research Objective: determine the role sinus parasites play in stranded cetaceans in central California, by combining data from gross necropsy, histopathology, and advanced imaging. Continue reading